Thoughts for Brides

Dream Wedding at the Hyatt Regency La Jolla

Combine perfect San Diego weather with the scenic views of La Jolla and you’ve found your dream wedding destination! Now add the most beautiful floral arrangements from Four Seasons Flowers and you have a wedding even Cinderella would envy.

The Asteria Terrace and Vicino Ballroom at the Hyatt Regency in La Jolla provided a stunning seaside location and created the perfect setting for our  Bride and Groom’s  most memorable day!

Soft pinks, creamy whites, accented with silvery greens set a romantic theme for this classic and graceful ceremony. Opulent white phaleonopsis orchids were cascading like a waterfall from the lush pink  roses and billowing white hydrangeas. The sweetheart table was picture perfect and bursting with romance and orchids. What a beautiful setting to begin your happily-ever-after!

tall-cascading-orchids-1 cascading-centerpiece

center-piece sweetheart-table canopy-bouquet




How to find the Right Wedding Vendors

With the vast array of “wedding advice” at our fingertips, I wanted to share a notable wedding blog from Huffington Post. Their journalists recently asked Stephanie and Jeff Padavoni of BookMoreBrides.com for their best advice for couples on how to find the right vendors who will work together to exceed the couple’s dreams of their wedding day. They are the #1 marketing resource for the wedding industry and understand the challenges and needs of both the couple and the vendors. Here’s what they had to say:

1. When you are hiring a vendor, you are purchasing their expertise as well as their time. And, it takes lots of time behind the scenes to create the final product such as floral arrangements for weddings.
Couples are often shocked at the price tag attached to wedding services. “But I’m only hiring you for four hours!” is a common reaction. In reality, vendors spend many hours outside your wedding day timeline on planning, communication, rehearsals, meetings, travel and all the logistics necessary to make their contribution to your day look easy and effortless. This doesn’t even take into account the necessary time and financial investment in initial training and education, as well as ongoing study and investment to keep skills sharp and equipment and offerings up to date.
Let’s take photographers as an example. According to this recent survey, the average photographer spends 65 hours invested in each wedding; when all the hours invested in a wedding are factored in, a typical wedding photographer makes an hourly wage only $37 per hour before expenses! DJs, florists, officiants, planners and other pros are in a similar situation.
Most wedding professionals are not living large on “wedding ripoffs,” a charge often lodged by the media. While the average wedding in the US costs around $25,000, a recent survey of our wedding professional audience revealed that 48% of wedding businesses make less than $25,000 in an entire YEAR.

2. If you hire an amateur for your wedding, expect an amateur result.
Wedding professionals are not a commodity item. You’re hiring a unique personality, talent and experience set. Those who charge more are often worth more, but their value is often difficult to measure in terms of dollars and cents. It is based on intangibles such as how well the vendor creates a rapport with you and seems to understand and care about your specific needs and desires. The amateurs you can hire for a dime a dozen are usually worth exactly the price you pay for them.
Sure, you might luck out and find the next undiscovered Preston Bailey for your wedding, but you’re much more likely to get sub-par performance along with that bargain price.

3. The truth about the “wedding markup.”
Much has been made of the so-called “wedding markup,” a phenomenon that occurs when secret shoppers get quoted a higher price for identical services when they are booked for a wedding as opposed to another type of event. While this certainly can occur, journalists neglect to address the very real reasons WHY this happens. The truth is that providing any service for a wedding is far more involved than a similar, non-wedding event. Wedding pros make themselves available for planning meetings, calls and consultations, and may well send hundreds of emails back and forth with a single client in the year or more of planning up to the wedding.
This type of time and attention isn’t expected or required for most non-wedding events; the time investment alone is enough to justify a higher price. The quality of wedding services often requires a greater degree of skill and specialization.

4. Make sure that YOUR wedding really matters to your vendors.
Again, this is another intangible, but pay close attention to whether or not a particular vendor seems more interested in being of service to you or closing the deal. A real wedding professional knows that each and every wedding has the potential to make or break their reputation. Make sure your vendors discuss their “Plan B” with you of what they will do in the event that something goes wrong. Make sure they are tending to the details and not just giving you sweeping generalities about what they do and how they do it. The details are their responsibility for delivering on your expectations.

5. Listen to your vendors’ advice — it can save you time, money, stress and disappointment.
There is a fine line between being unique and different from other weddings and being trite or inauthentic. A seasoned vendor has seen it all and can and should tactfully temper your enthusiasm when you are crossing that fine line. What may seem clever to you may be something your vendor has seen done before with disappointing results. Trust their experience and draw upon it. Know that when they suggest changes to your dream wedding scenario it may be because they have your best interests at heart. Do take advantage of a vendor’s knowledge and experience.

6. If you only have $10,000 to spend on your wedding, don’t expect your vendors to make it look like you spent $100,000.
Weddings can be expensive, and you certainly don’t have to spend a lot of money. But if you’re going to trim your budget, don’t expect it to be a carbon copy of the Royal wedding. Great vendors share their skills and experience to help you create a wonderful wedding, but they are not magicians.

7. A DIY wedding usually takes more time and money than hiring a professional.
There is lots of hype on wedding blogs and wedding reality TV about saving money by doing things yourself. Unfortunately, they misrepresent the details of what’s actually possible for a typical wedding with an average budget…one that doesn’t have a team of expert designers and planners working magic behind the scenes.
Wedding planning is overwhelming and stressful enough without trying to set up a craft factory in your garage to create clever favors for 200 guests or to arrange your own flowers.
If you think you’re going to save money by having the wedding in your backyard — you are heading for a rude awakening. When you add up the cost of the tent, rentals, food, alcohol, place settings and silverware, you end up spending MORE than you would hosting it in a traditional wedding venue.

8. Your wedding day will not be perfect, but a great team of vendors can make sure it’s as close as possible.
When it comes to your wedding, don’t forget that there is no such thing as a perfect wedding — something always happens that you didn’t expect or anticipate. Maybe your bridal party will be late, the weather won’t cooperate, or the guests will forget to take home those favors you agonized over. There are simply too many details and too tight of a timeline for everything to be completely perfect. But when something goes wrong, you can relax into the moment knowing your team will be doing their best to help make it right.
More weddings tips at huffingtonpost.com




Winter Color Trend: Greens & Whites with Dusty Pastel Accents

This winter, it’s all about mixing unexpected seasonal elements with elegant neutral details and a hint of sparkle and sequins.
Go back to basics and look to natural wintry greens, whites and ivories for your palette. Pair lush white blooms with leafy green accents, then add dusty accents like blush and sage for a subtle twist on an otherwise neutral palette.

Also big? Stark contrasts like cherry red and white or black and gold (think dramatic art deco) make a statement, and add serious definition to flowers and décor. Take a look theknot.com




A New Play on Patterns for your Wedding

Chevron was big last year, but this year’s fresh new additions are trellis patterns, bold stripes and floral patterns! They are being used on everything from the bridesmaid’s dresses to the cake. The table top is also a great way to incorporate patterns, but be careful to use them in moderation. You don’t want them overwhelm or conflict with your floral centerpiece. Consider a table runner or napkin with a pattern instead of your entire linen. A chair bow or a stylish band placed around a beautifully folded napkin can also be subtle ways to incorporate your print without letting it take over. If you want to use a pattern for the entire floor length table linen, be sure to bring a sample to your florist. Their expertise will be critical to help balance and blend your look with your flowers! And, I’m predicting more polka dots… Kate Spade style!




Top 2014 Spring Color Trends to Influence your Wedding Palette

Fashion color trends have a strong influence on floral design and vice versa! As color defines space and mood, it is a natural element of planning your wedding ambiance. From the bridesmaid’s dresses and table linens to the floral blooms in every arrangement color is critical!
*Looking ahead fashion and design leaders are taking a modern twist on the traditional for spring 2014 by pairing soft pastels with vivid brights to create a colorful palette. Fully inspired by a mixture of blooming flowers (notice the color labels), the designer’s travels abroad, and their confident use of color to refresh, revive and defy conventional wisdom.
No one does it better than Pantone. Their top color picks for women’s fashion this spring 2014 are:
• PANTONE 15-3920 Placid Blue
• PANTONE 16-3823 Violet Tulip
• PANTONE 15-6114 Hemlock
• PANTONE 16-0000 Paloma
• PANTONE 15-1225 Sand
• PANTONE 14-0852 Freesia
• PANTONE 18-1651 Cayenne
• PANTONE 17-1360 Celosia Orange
• PANTONE 18-3224 Radiant Orchid
PANTONE 18-3949 Dazzling Blue

*Credits: Pantone.com
* For color swatches and palette complements go to Pantone.com




How much are you planning to Budget for your Wedding Flowers?

You’ve probably heard that you should expect to spend anywhere from 10% – 15% of your total wedding budget on the flowers. However, that is a very broad number and how does all of that break down?

Here is a general guide to help you determine how much you can plan to spend. These are industry averages, but please understand that there are several factors that play a part in getting an accurate quote for your flowers. The most prominent factors in determining the wedding flowers budget are the types of flowers you choose and the number of designs you will need (i.e. do you have 3 bridesmaids or 10? 10 reception tables or 25?).

Bridal Bouquet: $150 – $350
Bridesmaid Bouquets: $55 – $100 each
Corsages: $20 – $45 each
Boutonnieres: $10.00 – $20 each
Flower Girl Basket with Petals: $25 – $40
Altar Arrangements: $150 – $500 each
Pew/Chair Markers: $15 – $50 each
Arch/Gazebo: $300 – $1,000
Chuppah Decor: $500 – $2000 (not including chuppah rental)
Buffet Table: $150 – $700
Guestbook Table: $45 – $125
Cake Topper: $55 – $125
Reception Centerpieces: $55 – $300 each
Toss Bouquet: Complimentary

Also know that most wedding florists will add an additional
fee for delivering and setting up your wedding flowers. If you have
rental items, there may also be a charge for coming back at the end of
your event to pick up those items.

If you are on a tight budget, here is a tip for lowering your price:

Focus on a color scheme, not on specific flowers:
Many of the so-called “wedding flowers” are very expensive. These
Include: mini calla lilies, stephanotis, hydrangeas, peonies,
ranunculus, tulips, viburnum, and lily of the valley. However, there
are many less expensive flowers that are available in the same colors
as the more expensive flowers. If some of the more expensive flowers are a “must have” for your wedding, then consider using them in the pieces that will count the most – your bridal bouquet, the main altar arrangements (where most of your wedding photos will be taken), the cake, etc. Use less
expensive flowers in the bridesmaid bouquets, arch and gazebo , and
reception centerpieces (photographers rarely take many pictures of
these since the guests have already arrived and are seated by the time, and they viewed and photographed at more distance

Source: unknown